Dr. Jeanne Bishop, Bully


NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Office of Professional Medical Conduct Complaint Form

mail to:
Office of Professional Medical Conduct, Central Intake Unit, Riverview Center, 150 Broadway – Suite 355, Albany, NY 12204-2719

INFORMATION ABOUT YOU
Name Woodlen Anne C
Address James Square Health and Rehabilitation Centre
918 James St., Syracuse, NY 13203

YOUR COMPLAINT REGARDING A PHYSICIAN OR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

Physician/Physician Assistant Name Bishop Jeanne E
Address James Square Health and Rehabilitation Centre
918 James St., Syracuse, NY 13203
Telephone (315) 474-1561

INFORMATION ABOUT THE PATIENT(S)
** You may add additional patient names on a separate sheet of paper.
Patient(s) Name Woodlen, Anne C.
Date of Birth 12/18/46

COMPLAINT
Describe your complaint as completely as possible. Please sign and date form.
When did this happen? Where did this happen?

On July 24 I was admitted to James Square nursing home with a primary diagnosis of SEID/ME—systemic exertion intolerance disease/myalgic encephalomyelitis. I asked the attending physician Dr. Jeanne Bishop what she knew about SEID/ME and she replied “Nothing.”

• The physician accepted a patient whom she did not know how to treat.

I asked Dr. Bishop what she would do to prepare herself—what would she read, who would she talk to, where would she go to learn? She gave no reply.

• The physician had no plan to provide proper treatment.

A month or two later I learned that I did not have a Do Not Resuscitate order or a MOLST. I requested a MOLST. When I followed up and asked where it was, I was told that the MOLST was in the nursing station, waiting for Dr. Bishop to fill it out with me. I requested that she follow up. She did not. I then talked with Tony the social worker and he told me that I could fill it out myself.

I got the MOLST form, tried to fill it out, and discovered that I couldn’t. I then contacted my Health Care Proxy/Power of Attorney, Dr. Stephen Wechsler. He finished filling out the form and signed it.

• Had Dr. Bishop acted appropriately and filled out the MOLST with me, she would have learned that I was not neurologically competent to fill it out.

I had a brief conversation with Dr. Bishop on November 18. She still needed to sign off on the MOLST. She said she had some question about dialysis, and other things. She said she would meet with me within the next two days, but there was no rush; I was not at risk of imminent death.

Fact: In addition to SEID, I have uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with a blood glucose of about 450, kidney damage, and daily chest pains. I am at constant risk of a heart attack or stroke.

On Friday, November 20, I got out of bed for the first time in days and went to James Square’s in-house bazaar, and the Resident Council meeting, lasting from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. It was the longest I had been out of bed for weeks and I was exhausted. When I returned to Unit 3 South, I met Dr. Bishop in the hallway. She tried to talk to me about the MOLST in the hallway but I was too tired. I went to my room and she followed me.

I had been saying that my POA and I both had signed the MOLST. Dr. Bishop showed it to me and, in fact, I had not signed it. My memory was not accurate. I was sitting in my wheelchair, backed up against the wall, with Dr. Bishop standing in front of me. She was coercing me and firing various statements at me that I could not follow or understand. I asked her to leave me alone and back away from me. She would not do it. I repeatedly, in the presence of aide Summarri (sp?), told her to leave me alone. Dr. Bishop would not.

• The patient has the right to refuse any procedure, including filling out paperwork. She should only have to refuse once. Dr. Bishop was abusive and would not stop pressuring me.

I have chronic fatigue syndrome and was exhausted. I have SEID, which compromises the nervous system. I have a glucose level of 450, which further disrupts the ability to think rationally. Dr. Bishop ignored all the medical factors which made me unable to think straight. She treated my neurological distress as simple bad behavior that she was determined to quell.

Nurse Heidi, who works nights on Unit 3 South, has several children, one of whom has ADHD and other neurological problems. She knows that there reaches a point where a neurologically compromised person cannot take in new information and process it. The only thing that can be done is step back, let the compromised person rest—in my case, a nap was essential—and then re-boot the nervous system and start over. Dr. Bishop was too unlearned to recognize the signs of neurological distress, and would not honor my right to refuse her domination.

I raised my voice and told her repeatedly to leave the room. Dr. Bishop would not do it. I have the right not to be bullied, harassed and abused by a physician who cares nothing for the comfort and welfare of her patient, but only cares about forcing the patient to accommodate the physician’s needs. Dr. Bishop demanded that I acknowledge that she was right when I had no idea whether she was or not. She ended by screaming at me that I was never to scream at her again, and then she stormed out of the room.

I want Dr. Bishop removed from my case immediately, and disciplined for abusing me and violating my rights.

About annecwoodlen

I am a tenth generation American, descended from a family that has been working a farm that was deeded to us by William Penn. The country has changed around us but we have held true. I stand in my grandmother’s kitchen, look down the valley to her brother’s farm and see my great-great-great-great-great-grandmother Hannah standing on the porch. She is holding the baby, surrounded by four other children, and saying goodbye to her husband and oldest son who are going off to fight in the Revolutionary War. The war is twenty miles away and her husband will die fighting. We are not the Daughters of the American Revolution; we were its mothers. My father, Milton C. Woodlen, got his doctorate from Temple University in the 1940’s when—in his words—“a doctorate still meant something.” He became an education professor at West Chester State Teachers College, where my mother, Elizabeth Hope Copeland, had graduated. My mother raised four girls and one boy, of which I am the middle child. My parents are deceased and my siblings are estranged. My fiancé, Robert H. Dobrow, was a fighter pilot in the Marine Corps. In 1974, his plane crashed, his parachute did not open, and we buried him in a cemetery on Long Island. I could say a great deal about him, or nothing; there is no middle ground. I have loved other men; Bob was my soul mate. The single greatest determinate of who I am and what my life has been is that I inherited my father’s gene for bipolar disorder, type II. Associated with all bipolar disorders is executive dysfunction, a learning disability that interferes with the ability to sort and organize. Despite an I.Q. of 139, I failed twelve subjects and got expelled from high school and prep school. I attended Syracuse University and Onondaga Community College and got an associate’s degree after twenty-five years. I am nothing if not tenacious. Gifted with intelligence, constrained by disability, and compromised by depression, my employment was limited to entry level jobs. Being female in the 1960’s meant that I did office work—billing at the university library, calling out telegrams at Western Union, and filing papers at a law firm. During one decade, I worked at about a hundred different places as a temporary secretary. I worked for hospitals, banks, manufacturers and others, including the county government. I quit the District Attorney’s Office to manage a gas station; it was more honest work. After Bob’s death, I started taking antidepressants. Following doctor’s orders, I took them every day for twenty-six years. During that time, I attempted%2
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One Response to Dr. Jeanne Bishop, Bully

  1. Jennifer says:

    Sorry you had to deal with this. Sounds like a bully to me!

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