Author Archives: annecwoodlen

About annecwoodlen

I am a tenth generation American, descended from a family that has been working a farm that was deeded to us by William Penn. The country has changed around us but we have held true. I stand in my grandmother’s kitchen, look down the valley to her brother’s farm and see my great-great-great-great-great-grandmother Hannah standing on the porch. She is holding the baby, surrounded by four other children, and saying goodbye to her husband and oldest son who are going off to fight in the Revolutionary War. The war is twenty miles away and her husband will die fighting. We are not the Daughters of the American Revolution; we were its mothers. My father, Milton C. Woodlen, got his doctorate from Temple University in the 1940’s when—in his words—“a doctorate still meant something.” He became an education professor at West Chester State Teachers College, where my mother, Elizabeth Hope Copeland, had graduated. My mother raised four girls and one boy, of which I am the middle child. My parents are deceased and my siblings are estranged. My fiancé, Robert H. Dobrow, was a fighter pilot in the Marine Corps. In 1974, his plane crashed, his parachute did not open, and we buried him in a cemetery on Long Island. I could say a great deal about him, or nothing; there is no middle ground. I have loved other men; Bob was my soul mate. The single greatest determinate of who I am and what my life has been is that I inherited my father’s gene for bipolar disorder, type II. Associated with all bipolar disorders is executive dysfunction, a learning disability that interferes with the ability to sort and organize. Despite an I.Q. of 139, I failed twelve subjects and got expelled from high school and prep school. I attended Syracuse University and Onondaga Community College and got an associate’s degree after twenty-five years. I am nothing if not tenacious. Gifted with intelligence, constrained by disability, and compromised by depression, my employment was limited to entry level jobs. Being female in the 1960’s meant that I did office work—billing at the university library, calling out telegrams at Western Union, and filing papers at a law firm. During one decade, I worked at about a hundred different places as a temporary secretary. I worked for hospitals, banks, manufacturers and others, including the county government. I quit the District Attorney’s Office to manage a gas station; it was more honest work. After Bob’s death, I started taking antidepressants. Following doctor’s orders, I took them every day for twenty-six years. During that time, I attempted%2

Crouse PromptCare = Diagnosis + Cops


I went to Crouse PromptCare at 11:15 a.m. Signed in. Did not get called to check in with insurance, etc. At 11:35 a.m. got called into a treatment room with Peter, a nurse. He couldn’t get blood pressure but did … Continue reading

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Related Management’s Reply


Good afternoon Ms. Woodlen, We are aware of the unfortunate that occurred yesterday and are thankful that there were no injuries to anyone at the site. One of our experienced maintenance team members responded to the emergency call and completed … Continue reading

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A High-rise in Dubai; a Fire in Syracuse


Yesterday there was another McCarthy Manor fire, this time two apartments directly below me. http://www.syracuse.com/crime/index.ssf/2015/04/crews_responding_to_fire_at_apartment_complex_near_syracuse_hospitals.html What was not reported in the newspaper article is that this eight-story building, located at 501 S. Crouse Ave., is home to 176 people, more … Continue reading

Posted in Death, disability, Government Services, HUD-subsidized housing, Poverty, power wheelchairs, Powerlessness, Values | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Time Warner Way (Part I)


My father was a college professor who had five children and an old 14-room house: he knew how to fix things. I grew up watching him analyze broken stuff and then figure out how to fix it. If it was … Continue reading

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The $5.2 Million Man: When Is It Time To Die?


Five-point-two million dollars were spent to keep one 69-year-old retired prison guard alive in the Duke University Hospital ICU for 34 days; he was then discharged to death. His wife said, “I was just hoping it would save my husband’s … Continue reading

Posted in American medical industry, Death, drugs, Medicaid, Medical care, Medicare, physician, Poverty, Values | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wallenda on the Wire


Originally posted on Anne C Woodlen: Notes in Passing:
Karl Wallenda created his crowning achievement — the seven-person chair pyramid.  Four men stood on a wire 35 feet in the air [without a net], two pairs yoked together by shoulder…

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Why Not Sex on the Beach?


Originally posted on Anne C Woodlen: Notes in Passing:
I was in a restaurant, waiting for my colleagues to arrive for a business meeting, when the bartender asked me if I’d like a drink.  Yes, I would, but I hadn’t…

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